Wednesday, November 30, 2016

A TRIBUTE TO THE EAGLES ONE OF THE LAST CONCERTS WITH GLENN FREY


The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner. With five number-one singles, six Grammy Awards, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, were ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the United States according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" and the band was ranked number 75 on the magazine's 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

The Eagles are one of the world's best-selling bands of all time, having sold more than 150 million records[3]—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. "Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975)" was the best selling album of the 20th century in the U.S.[4] They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and the highest-selling American band in U.S. history.




The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three top 40 singles: "Take It Easy", "Witchy Woman", and "Peaceful Easy Feeling". Their next album, Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, only reaching number 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the top 40. However, the album contained two of the band's most popular tracks: "Desperado" and "Tequila Sunrise". They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder as its fifth member midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two top 40 singles: "Already Gone" and their first number one, "Best of My Love".


Their 1975 album One of These Nights included three top 10 singles: "One of These Nights", "Lyin' Eyes", and "Take It to the Limit", the first hitting the top of the charts. The Eagles continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell more than 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and more than 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, "New Kid in Town" and "Hotel California". They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three top 10 singles: "Heartache Tonight", "The Long Run", and "I Can't Tell You Why", the lead single being another chart-topping hit.

The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for the album Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured consistently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years and their sixth number one album. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. In 2013, they began the extended History of the Eagles Tour in conjunction with the band's documentary release, History of the Eagles.


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Monday, November 28, 2016

MEDICAL ALERT DEVICES WHO CAN YOU TRUST?

 Medical alert devices could save you or a loved one his or her life but Which company can you trust? How do they work? 

Next Friday we will share valuable information that could make a difference in an emergency situation.

Que tal amigos el próximo viernes voy a compartir con ustedes mi historia sobre estos aparatos de alerta médica conocidos como  "Medical Alert", los cuales sirven para monitorear cuando uno de nuestros seres queridos ya mayores necesitan atención médica de emergencia porque se han caído o les ocurre algún otro síntoma médico que requiere pronta atención.

Son muy necesarios sobretodo para personas que viven solas y con solo pulsar un botón están en contacto con alguien que les puede salvar la vida.

¿PERO EN QUÉ COMPAÑÍAS PUEDES CONFIAR? WHICH COMPANIES CAN YOU TRUST?

El próximo viernes  les compartiré mi propia historia y experiencia...



Saturday, November 26, 2016

CUBA´S FORMER PRESIDENT FIDEL CASTRO HAS DIED

Cuba's former president Fidel Castro, one of the world's longest-serving and most iconic leaders, has died aged 90.

Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz, commonly known as Fidel Castro, was a Cuban politician and revolutionary who governed the Republic of Cuba as Prime Minister from 1959 to 1976 and then as President from 1976 to 2008.

His younger brother and successor as president Raul Castro announced the news on state television.

Castro toppled the government in 1959, introducing a Communist revolution. He defied the US for decades, surviving many assassination plots.

His supporters said he had given Cuba back to the people. Critics saw him as a dictator.








Thursday, November 24, 2016

HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO ALL OF YOU!

EL NOTICOTO MAGAZINE, RADIO SENSACIÓN and TONY FRANCO RADIO SHOW WISH YOU ALL A VERY HAPPY THANKSGIVING! AND THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT...

 

happy thanksgiving

Este jueves a las 9 pm nuestro programa especial para aquellas personas que no tendrán con quien estar en esta ocasión por diferentes motivos el Día de Acción de Gracias los encontrará en un país lejano lejos de su tierra y su hogar, pero nosotros seremos tu familia y te vamos a dedicar todo el programa "ÉXITOS Y RECUERDOS..." para recordar a tus seres queridos y los momentos felices de las fiestas compartidas con cada uno de ellos, puedes llamarnos al (562) 263-7626 y pedir cualquier canción que te recuerde a un ser querido y te acerque a él o a ella... 

happy thanksgiving
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PULSA EN ESTA FOTO PARA IR A LA PÁGINA DE KIMO CELL REPAIR
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Tuesday, November 22, 2016


THE NEWS THAT SHOCKED THE WORLD 53 YEARS AGO...

Fifty three years have passed since one of my favorite presidents was killed. On November 22, 1963, the entire world  was shocked by the news that John F. Kennedy, President of the United States, had been assassinated. And even though many have tried to convince us, that his killer Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, most of us still believe the contrary...

Historian Robert Dallek once said “People cannot believe someone as inconsequential as Oswald could kill someone as consequential as an American president,” author of An Unfinished Life, a 2003 JFK biography.



JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY PRESIDENCY


His famous words as he addressed the nation will never be forgotten by those who admired him "SEEK NOT WHAT YOUR COUNTRY CAN DO FOR YOU, AS WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR COUNTRY..."


Today, the question still remains...Why has the government and the CIA postponed the date to make all the documents linked to the case public? 

According to the United States Government, these documents "could be made public next year in October 2017. But, Are all the documents going to be released?, or Will the CIA claim that some might be too sensitive to be exposed...By the time these documents become available to the public many people would probably not remember who John F. Kennedy was, or will just recognized him as the assassinated president in the sixties and nothing more, but most of us who remember and are interested to know who killed our beloved president, will be gone...

I believe that yes, this might be the speech that killed President Kennedy...


Don Adams, a retired FBI agent whose career as an FBI agent spanned 22 years, never really bought the official line of his own employer: that Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone, assassinated President John F. Kennedy.

Adams, who died on June 14 at age 83 in Akron, Ohio, eventually wrote From an Office Building with a High-Powered Rifle (Trine Day, 2012), in which he argued that “the FBI’s investigation was compromised from the top down, beginning with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover.” He made this revelation about John F. Kennedy assassination: 


I will share vídeos with different opinions, theories and some facts about Kennedy´s death and YOU WILL DECIDE if  President Kennedy´s assassination was a conspiracy or not...

Top 10 Reasons To Believe There Was A Conspiracy To Assassinate JFK




In an essay for The Washington Post, prolific novelist Joyce Carol Oates opines that the real problem in the aftermath of the assassination of President Kennedy was not the government’s implausible and mendacious account of the crime but the confused and outraged response of the American majority that could not–and does not–believe it.

What do you believe...?



WE  INVITE YOU TO SEE MORE ARTICLES AND NEWS ABOUT JOHN F. KENNEDY HERE FACTS ON JOHN F. KENNEDY

Friday, November 11, 2016

WE HONOR OUR VETERANS THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!

El Día de los Veteranos es un día festivo y nacional en Estados Unidos en el cual la población rinde homenaje a aquellos que han servido a las Fuerzas armadas de los Estados Unidos.

WE HONOR OUR VETERANS TODAY AROUND THE WORLD...WE ARE VERY PROUD OF EACH ONE OF YOU! THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO THIS GREAT NATION...


















En RADIO SENSACIÓN rendimos homenaje junto con nuestra revista EL NOTICOTO a todos nuestros orgullosos veteranos.



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Wednesday, November 9, 2016

DONALD TRUMP ELECTED 45TH PRESIDENT OF USA

tony-franco-30From the beginning when he announced his candidacy,  Donald Trump was heavily criticized and even many members of his party did not want him as a Republican presidential candidate, however this Tuesday, November 8, against all odds and obstacles, Donald Trump was elected as the new President of the United States in a close race in the popular vote, but more notorious in the electoral votes count. 
Donald Trump was the winner in 30 states, while Hillary Clinton won 20 states and the District of Columbia.


The United States Congress will also be Republican majority, which will facilitate the task of the new president-elected Donald Trump.















In the Democratic headquarters, many people were sad about the results but also surprised of the vast support received by Trump, since the polls were favoring Clinton in many states just a few days ago,  but she lost!   

To all our readers I have to say this.... We never know what the future might bring,  but sometimes, the one who we less expect to do the right thing, might be the one who ends up doing it better! Let´s give Donald Trump a chance as President before judging him. 

I really like his attitude on his victory speech.   He praised Hillary Clinton and was a humble winner, not an arrogant one. He also reached for those who did not vote for him to unified forces and come together as one, to work hard and make this country a great nation once again! 



On behalf of our magazine EL NOTICOTO www.elnoticoto.com and our radio program TONY FRANCO RADIO SHOW www.elshowdetonyfranco.com,  want to extend my congratulations to the new President  DONALD J. TRUMP and I would like to ask  all our readers and listeners to join and support the new President  and put aside our differences to make this great country of us, a strong and powerful nation with equal opportunities for all regardless of race or social class ....






DONALD TRUMP ELECTED 45TH PRESIDENT OF USA

tony-franco-30From the beginning when he announced his candidacy,  Donald Trump was heavily criticized and even many members of his party did not want him as a Republican presidential candidate, however this Tuesday, November 8, against all odds and obstacles, Donald Trump was elected as the new President of the United States in a close race in the popular vote, but more notorious in the electoral votes count. 
Donald Trump was the winner in 30 states, while Hillary Clinton won 20 states and the District of Columbia.


The United States Congress will also be Republican majority, which will facilitate the task of the new president-elected Donald Trump.
















In-the Democratic headquarters, many people were sad about the results but also surprised of the vast support received by Trump, since the polls were favoring Clinton in many states just a few days ago,  but she lost!                           
On behalf of our magazine EL NOTICOTO and our radio program TONY FRANCO RADIO SHOW,  want to extend my congratulations to the new President  DONALD TRUMP and we appeal to all our readers and listeners to join and support the new President  and put aside our differences to make this great country of us, a strong and powerful nation with equal opportunities for all regardless of race or social class ....






Saturday, November 5, 2016

DON'T FORGET TO SET YOUR CLOCK ONE HOUR BACK!

It’s always nice to have extra hour of sleep on the weekend, and we’re about to get one as we fall back out of Daylight Saving Time.
This year, Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, Nov. 6. 
The time change officially takes place at 2 a.m., but you don’t have to spring out of bed and move the big hand on your clock back an hour. The change is automatic for most smartphones, computers, tablets and other digital devices.





Wednesday, November 2, 2016

DAY OF THE DEAD Celebrated Throughout Mexico And Many Other Cultures


Compiled by Tony Franco
November 2nd, sees the celebration of the Day of the Dead festival. Mexico is best known for this festival, but it is also is celebrated elsewhere in Latin America.


It´s an interesting blend of different traditional indigenous beliefs, with a few catholic influences thrown in.

The day of the Dead, or “Dia de los Muertos” in Spanish is a celebration of the lives of the deceased. It is in fact a joyous celebration of one´s ancestors. Mexico´s Day of the Dead celebrations can be traced back to indigenous cultural traditions of the Maya, Aztec, Olmec, Mixtec, P’urhépecha, Zapotec and Totonac cultures.

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de los Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and around the world in many cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for
and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico, where it attains the quality of a National Holiday.



The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2). Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. Most believe that the children´s souls come and visit their loved ones on November 1st, and on the 2nd the adults´souls visit their families and friends.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to a goddess called Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world: In Brazil, Dia de Finados is a public holiday that many Brazilians celebrate by visiting cemeteries and churches. In Spain, there are festivals and parades, and, at the end of the day, people gather at cemeteries and pray for their dead loved ones. Similar observances occur elsewhere in Europe, and similarly themed celebrations appear in many Asian and African cultures.


OBSERVANCE IN MEXICO
ORIGINS


The Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico can be traced back to the indigenous cultures. Rituals celebrating the deaths of ancestors have been observed by these civilizations perhaps for as long as 2,500–3,000 years. In the pre-Hispanic era, it was common to keep skulls as trophies and display them during the rituals to symbolize death and rebirth.

The festival that became the modern Day of the Dead fell in the ninth month of the Aztec calendar, about the beginning of August, and was celebrated for an entire month. The festivities were dedicated to the god known as the "Lady of the Dead", corresponding to the modern Catrina.

In most regions of Mexico, November 1 honors children and infants, whereas deceased adults are honored on November 2. This is indicated by generally referring to November 1 mainly as Día de los Inocentes ("Day of the Innocents") but also as Día de los Angelitos ("Day of the Little Angels") and November 2 as Día de los Muertos or Día de los Difuntos ("Day of the Dead").


Sculpture with skeletons made for Day of the Dead at the Museo de Arte Popular, Mexico City.


Catrinas, popular figures of the Day of the Dead.

BELIEFS

People go to cemeteries to be with the souls of the departed and build private altars containing the favorite foods and beverages as well as photos and memorabilia of the departed. The intent is to encourage visits by the souls, so that the souls will hear the prayers and the comments of the living directed to them. Celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed.

Plans for the day are made throughout the year, including gathering the goods to be offered to the dead. During the three-day period, families usually clean and decorate graves; most visit the cemeteries where their loved ones are buried and decorate their graves with ofrendas ("offerings"), which often include orange mexican marigolds (Tagetes erecta) called cempasúchitl(originally named cempoalxochitl, Nahuatl for "twenty flowers").

In modern Mexico, this name is sometimes replaced with the term Flor de Muerto ("Flower of the Dead"). These flowers are thought to attract souls of the dead to the offerings.

Toys are brought for dead children (los angelitos, or "the little angels"), and bottles of tequila, mezcal or pulque or jars of atole for adults. Families will also offer trinkets or the deceased's favorite candies on the grave. Ofrendas are also put in homes, usually with foods such as candied pumpkin, pan de muerto ("bread of the dead"), and sugar skulls and beverages such as atole. The ofrendas are left out in the homes as a welcoming gesture for the deceased. Some people believe the spirits of the dead eat the "spiritual essence" of the ofrendas food, so even though the celebrators eat the food after the festivities, they believe it lacks nutritional value. Pillows and blankets are left out so that the deceased can rest after their long journey. In some parts of Mexico, such as the towns of Mixquic, Pátzcuaro and Janitzio, people spend all night beside the graves of their relatives. In many places, people have picnics at the grave site as well.





Some families build altars or small shrines in their homes; these usually have the Christian cross, statues or pictures of the Blessed Virgin Mary, pictures of deceased relatives and other persons, scores of candles and an ofrenda. Traditionally, families spend some time around the altar, praying and telling anecdotes about the deceased. In some locations, celebrants wear shells on their clothing, so that when they dance, the noise will wake up the dead; some will also dress up as the deceased.

Public schools at all levels build altars with ofrendas, usually omitting the religious symbols. Government offices usually have at least a small altar, as this holiday is seen as important to the Mexican heritage.


Those with a distinctive talent for writing sometimes create short poems, called calaveras ("skulls"), mocking epitaphs of friends, describing interesting habits and attitudes or funny anecdotes. This custom originated in the 18th or 19th century, after a newspaper published a poem narrating a dream of a cemetery in the future, "and all of us were dead", proceeding to "read" the tombstones. Newspapers dedicate calaveras to public figures, with cartoons of skeletonsin the style of the famous calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada, a Mexican illustrator. Theatrical presentations of Don Juan Tenorio by José Zorrilla (1817–1893) are also traditional on this day.

A common symbol of the holiday is the skull (colloquially called calavera), which celebrants represent in masks, called calacas (colloquial term for "skeleton"), and foods such as sugar or chocolate skulls, which are inscribed with the name of the recipient on the forehead. Sugar skulls are gifts that can be given to both the living and the dead. Other holiday foods include pan de muerto, a sweet egg bread made in various shapes from plain rounds to skulls and rabbits, often decorated with white frosting to look like twisted bones.

José Guadalupe Posada created a famous print of a figure that he called La Calavera de la Catrina ("calavera of the female dandy") as a parody of a Mexican upper-class female. Posada's striking image of a costumed female with a skeleton face has become associated with the Day of the Dead, and Catrina figures often are a prominent part of modern Day of the Dead observances.


Gran calavera eléctrica ("Grand electric skull") by José Guadalupe Posada, 1900–1913.

The traditions and activities that take place in celebration of the Day of the Dead are not universal and often vary from town to town. For example, in the town of Pátzcuaro on the Lago de Pátzcuaro in Michoacán, the tradition is very different if the deceased is a child rather than an adult. On November 1 of the year after a child's death, the godparents set a table in the parents' home with sweets, fruits, pan de muerto, a cross, a rosary (used to ask the Virgin Mary to pray for them) and candles. This is meant to celebrate the child's life, in respect and appreciation for the parents.

There is also dancing with colorful costumes, often with skull-shaped masks and devil masks in the plaza or garden of the town. At midnight on November 2, the people light candles and ride winged boats called mariposas (Spanish for "butterflies") to Janitzio, an island in the middle of the lake where there is a cemetery, to honor and celebrate the lives of the dead there.


Families tidying and decorating graves at a cemetery in Almoloya del Río in the State of Mexico.

In contrast, the town of Ocotepec, north of Cuernavaca in the State of Morelos, opens its doors to visitors in exchange for veladoras (small wax candles) to show respect for the recently deceased. In return, the visitors receive tamales and atole. This is only done by the owners of the house where somebody in the household has died in the previous year. Many people of the surrounding areas arrive early to eat for free and enjoy the elaborate altars set up to receive the visitors from Mictlán.

In some parts of the country (especially the cities, where in recent years there are displaced other customs), children in costumes roam the streets, knocking on people's doors for a calaverita, a small gift of candies or money; they also ask passersby for it. This custom is similar to that of Halloween's trick-or-treating and is relatively recent.

Some people believe that possessing Day of the Dead items can bring good luck. Many people get tattoos or have dolls of the dead to carry with them. They also clean their houses and prepare the favorite dishes of their deceased loved ones to place upon their altar or ofrenda.



LATIN AMERICA

In Ecuador, the Day of the Dead is observed to some extent by all parts of society, though it is especially important to the indigenous Kichwa peoples who make up an estimated quarter of the population. Indigena families gather together in the community cemetery with offerings of food for a day-long remembrance of their ancestors and lost loved ones. Ceremonial foods include colada morada, a spiced fruit porridge that derives its deep purple color from the Andean blackberry and purple maize. This is typically consumed with guagua de pan, a bread shaped like a swaddled infant, though variations include many pigs—the latter being traditional to the city of Loja.

The bread, which is wheat flour-based today but was made with cornmeal in the pre-Columbian era, can be made savory with cheese inside or sweet with a filling of guava paste. These traditions have permeated into mainstream society as well, where food establishments add both colada morada and gaugua de pan to their menus for the season. Many non-indigenous Ecuadorians partake in visiting the graves of the deceased and preparing the traditional foods as well.

The Brazilian public holiday of Finados (Day of the Dead) is celebrated on November 2. Similar to other Day of the Dead celebrations, people go to cemeteries and churches with flowers, candles, and prayer. The celebration is intended to be positive to celebrate those who are deceased.

Guatemalan celebrations of the Day of the Dead are highlighted by the construction and flying of giant kites in addition to the traditional visits to grave sites of ancestors. A big event also is the consumption of fiambre, which is made only for this day during the year.




In Haiti, voodoo traditions mix with Roman Catholic observances as, for example, loud drums and music are played at all-night celebrations at cemeteries to wakenBaron Samedi, the Loa of the dead, and his mischievous family of offspring, the Gede.

Dia de los ñatitas ("Day of the Skulls") is a festival celebrated in La Paz, Bolivia, on November 9. In pre-Columbian times, indigenous Andeans had a tradition of sharing a day with the bones of their ancestors on the third year after burial; however, only the skulls are used today. Traditionally, the skull of one or more family members are kept at home to watch over the family and protect them during the year. On November 9, the family crowns the skull with fresh flowers, sometimes also dressing it up in various garments, and makes offerings of cigarettes, coca leaves, alcohol, and various other items in thanks for the year's protection. The skulls are also sometimes taken to the central cemetery in La Paz for a special Mass and blessing.


Day of the Dead altar in Atlanta in memory of Jennifer Ann Crecente,
murdered at the age of 18 by her ex-boyfriend.


An altar in Los Angelespays homage to "dead" TV shows,
with traditional marigolds, sugar skulls and candles

UNITED STATES

In many American communities with Mexican residents, Day of the Dead celebrations are held that are very similar to those held in Mexico. In some of these communities, such as in Texas and Arizona, the celebrations tend to be mostly traditional. For example, the All Souls Procession has been an annual Tucson event since 1990. The event combines elements of traditional Day of the Dead celebrations with those of pagan harvest festivals. People wearing masks carry signs honoring the dead and an urn in which people can place slips of paper with prayers on them to be burned.

In other communities, interactions between Mexican traditions and American culture are resulting in celebrations in which Mexican traditions are being extended to make artistic or sometimes political statements. For example, in Los Angeles, California, the Self Help Graphics & Art Mexican-American cultural center presents an annual Day of the Dead celebration that includes both traditional and political elements, such as altars to honor the victims of the Iraq War highlighting the high casualty
rate among Latino soldiers.

An updated, inter-cultural version of the Day of the Dead is also evolving at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. There, in a mixture of Mexican traditions and Hollywood hip, conventional altars are set up side-by-side with altars to Jayne Mansfield and Johnny Ramone. Colorful native dancers and music intermix with performance artists, while sly pranksters play on traditional themes.

Similar traditional and inter-cultural updating of Mexican celebrations is occurring in San Francisco, for example, through the Galería de la Raza, SomArts Cultural Center, Mission Cultural Center, de Young Museum and altars atGarfield Square by the Marigold Project. Oakland is home to Corazon Del Pueblo in the Fruitvale district. Corazon Del Pueblo has a shop offering handcrafted Mexican gifts and a museum devoted to Day of the Dead artifacts.

InMissoula, Montana, skeletal celebrants on stilts, novelty bicycles, and skis parade through town. It also occurs annually at historic Forest Hills Cemetery in Boston's Jamaica Plain neighborhood. Sponsored by Forest Hills Educational Trust and the folkloric performance group La Piñata, the Day of the Dead celebration celebrates the cycle of life and death. People bring offerings of flowers, photos, mementos, and food for their departed loved ones, which they place at an elaborately and colorfully decorated altar. A program of traditional music and dance also accompanies the community event.

EUROPE

In many countries with a Roman Catholic heritage, All Saints Day and All Souls Day have long been holidays in which people take the day off work, go to cemeteries with candles and flowers, and give presents to children, usually sweets and toys. In Portugal and Spain, ofrendas ("offerings") are made on this day. In Spain, the play Don Juan Tenorio is traditionally performed. In Spain, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Ireland, people bring flowers to the graves of dead relatives and say prayers over the dead.

A Mexican-style Day of the Dead has been celebrated in Prague, Czech Republic, as part of a promotion by the Mexican embassy. Local citizens join in a celebration of the Day of the Dead put on by a theatre group with masks, candles, and sugar skulls.

The PHILIPPINES and OCEANIA

Flowers, including Mexican marigolds, used in the celebration of the Day of the Dead.

In the Philippines, the holiday is called Todos Los Santos (All Saints Day), Undas (from Spanish andas, or possibly honra), orAraw ng mga Patay ("Day of the Dead"), and has more of a family reunion atmosphere. The traditions were imported during the era of New Spain, when Mexico governed the Philippines. Tombs are cleaned or repainted, candles are lit, and flowers are offered. Entire families camp in cemeteries and sometimes spend a night or two near their relatives' tombs. Card games, eating, drinking, singing and dancing are common activities in the cemetery. It is considered a very important holiday by many Filipinos (after Christmas and Holy Week), and additional days are normally given as special non-working holidays (but only November 1 is a regular holiday).

Mexican-style Day of the Dead celebrations is celebrated in mayor cities in Australia, Fiji and Indonesia. Prominent celebrations are held in Wellington, New Zealand, complete with altars celebrating the deceased with flowers and gifts.
Similar traditions

Many other cultures around the world have similar traditions of a day set aside to visit the graves of deceased family members. Often included in these traditions are celebrations, food and beverages, in addition to prayers and remembrances of the departed.

In some cultures in Africa, visits to the graves of ancestors, the leaving of food and gifts, and the asking of protection serve as important parts of traditional rituals.
(Source Wikipedia)